Keep fit and save electricity: climb the stairs the geeky way

Keep fit and save electricity

Geeky way to persuade people climb the stairs – see in in Tokyo/Shibuya

Its not easy to persuade people to climb the stairs instead of taking the elevator.

Tokyu Hands store in Shibuya found a geeky way to persuade people to Keep fit and save electricity at the same time:

Show the calories your body burns walking up the stairs, which should help you loose weight – and save on the store’s electricity bill at the same time.

After the Fukushima nuclear disaster and the closure of all of Japan’s nuclear power stations, saving electricity has become a top priority. In Tokyo’s subway and trains fluorescent lighting has been replaced by LED lighting, some fluorescent tubes have been removed, and some elevators were at least temporarily shut down to save electricity – in Japanese: 節電. The Tokyu Hands Store in Shibuya found a geeky way to encourage customers to keep fit, burn calories, climb the stairs, and save electricity all at the same time.

Keep fit and save electricity: geeky way to encourage people to climb stairs and save electricity, seen in Tokyo at Tokyu Hands Shibuya store
Keep fit and save electricity: geeky way to encourage people to climb stairs and save electricity, seen in Tokyo at Tokyu Hands Shibuya store

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  • Lennart Liberg

    Nice. Out of curiosity, I googled a bit, and got numbers for elevator energy use on the order of magnitude of 2 Wh/floor. Going up 5 floors would thus be 0.01 kWh. The japanese yearly electricity use per capita is roughly 8000 kWh. Given that a person may go there ten times a year, this actually turns out to a yearly saving of 0.01 * 10 / 8000 = 0.000125 % of the average citizen electricity use footprint
    http://fatknowledge.blogspot.se/…/how-much-energy-does…
    http://www.triplepundit.com/2007/04/askpablo-going-up/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_in_Japan

    • g_fasol

      very interesting- but multiply by a population of 125 million, then you’ll get about 1.5% of Japan’s electricity usage ( 0.000125 % x 125 million) – sounds to high….